There Are 8 Million Lawsuits in the Naked Cowboy

This blog post is not authored by, endorsed by, or affiliated with the Naked Cowboy(R), and other stuff our lawyer made us say.

Photo Courtesy Ryan McGinnis

A New York New Year’s tradition is the dropping of the ball in Times Square.

Another is fast becoming the serving of the New Year’s lawsuit by Times Square’s scantily clad troubadour, the Naked Cowboy.

Robert John Burck, aka the Naked Cowboy, recently sued CBS and the producers of the soap opera “The Bold and The Beautiful” for an episode showcasing a character in “Naked Cowboy signature garb” of cowboy hat, cowboy boots, tighty whitey briefs, and strategically placed guitar. The suit seeks $15 million damages for a casebook worth of intellectual property-related legal injuries, including trademark infringement, trademark dilution, false advertising, misappropriation of right of publicity, and unfair business practices.

But guys, you missed the most obvious claim of all– infringement of trade dress.

The complaint claims that the suit was filed only after the defendants ignored multiple requests to take a $150,000 license, in order that the “integrity and propriety of the brand be kept in tact [sic].”

Would that have been a naked license?

In 2008, Burck sued candy maker Mars, Inc. on the grounds that Times Square billboards and a mural featuring a guitar-strumming, underwear-clad blue M&M infringed his Naked Cowboy trademark and rights of publicity. The judge dismissed the right of publicity claim on the grounds that Burck could not claim it for a fictional character; the parties later reached a confidential settlement regarding the trademark infringement claims.

In 2009, Los Angeles videogame maker Gameloft filed a preemptive lawsuit against Burck seeking a ruling that the appearance of a scantily clad, guitar strumming character in its videogame, New York Nights, was not an infringement of the Naked Cowboy trademark.

Also in 2009, Burck sued Clear Channel Communications, claiming that its Tampa radio station created and promoted a Naked Cowboy imposter.

In 2010, Burck sued Sandra Brodsky, a bikini-clad, guitar strumming ex-stripper who strolled Times Square as the Naked Cowgirl, after she refused to sign a Naked Cowboy franchise agreement (going price: $5,000 per year or $500 per month) and ignored a cease-and-desist letter to halt all Times Square performances. Burck’s complaint alleged that the Naked Cowgirl would cause confusion among potential consumers of Naked Cowboy services, and tarnish his wholesome image, by her frequent use of obscene language and gestures towards uncooperative tourists.

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